1. dinosaurspen:

    supernikoe:

    if i had money i would buy so many old computers

    why dont i have more money….

    The pain is real… 

    I had to curb my collecting due to money issues, not that I had a whole lot to work with in the beginning. I mostly looked for trade deals, bargains and people giving things away for free (happens more often than you’d think, at least in my experience).

    Also I used to collect old microcomputers in general (mostly 80s stuff), but I decided to focus exclusively on DEC computers … that’s managed to cut down the influx of retrocomputer acquisitions dramatically. That said, I’ll still take free/cheap computers regardless of manufacturer. (Which is how I ended up with my ‘98 G3 iMac a couple months back.)

    Thankfully, our focus on mainframes and minis has prevented us from even contemplating building a physical collection.

  2. 
1967, Joel Platt and Dave Rodgers - "The time spent with the Athena was a lot of fun. Every time we walked into the room, something new happened. We often pulled all nighters just because there was a lot to find out about the machine. The picture of Dave and Joel at the console is a good example. This is the first time they actually got a simple program to run. Excited and puzzled all at once." [x]

    1967, Joel Platt and Dave Rodgers"The time spent with the Athena was a lot of fun. Every time we walked into the room, something new happened. We often pulled all nighters just because there was a lot to find out about the machine. The picture of Dave and Joel at the console is a good example. This is the first time they actually got a simple program to run. Excited and puzzled all at once." [x]

    (Source: supernikoe)

  3. dinosaurspen:

    Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University.

  4. blatantlyloquacious:

Found in a 1970s edition World Book.

    blatantlyloquacious:

    Found in a 1970s edition World Book.

  5. dinosaurspen:

Illustration of operators at a mainframe computer, circa 1962. From the HSBC Archives. 

    dinosaurspen:

    Illustration of operators at a mainframe computer, circa 1962. From the HSBC Archives. 

  6. dinosaurspen:

    When computers were hand-built - Teradyne semiconductor automatic test equipment factory, circa 1960s.

    See the full set here

  7. How “Computer Geeks” replaced “Computer Girls”  →

    One of the goals of System/360 is to chronicle not only the computers of the mainframe & mini eras, but also the people who used them. Despite some claims to the contrary, computers have always been as much a part of “women’s work” as they have been with men. This article, via Faruk Ateş, goes into some of that history.

  8. (Source: 1950sunlimited)

  9. design-is-fine:

    Olivetti and a bit of computer history. The italian company began to develop mainframe computers in the late 1950s. Elea was an italian acronym for “Arithmetical Electronic Computer”. 2 | Prototype Elea 9002, 1957-59. Photo: Federico Patellani. 4 | Elea 9003, the first fully transistorized commercial computer. Industrial design by Ettore Sottsass. Leased to 40 customers. Photo Archivio Andries Van Onck. 1+3 | Details of the console Elea 9003/02, Design by Sottsass jr. Foto Elisabetta Mori.

    (Source: design-is-fine)

  10. Norsk Data

    Norsk Data